Valentine Crafts for Kids, Preschoolers and Toddlers, Part 2

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner, and my blog is being slammed by people looking for Valentine crafts.  (And some of them started right after Christmas!  Who are you highly organized, far-seeing people?!  I’m not worthy of you!)  I just couldn’t do the same old crafts, so I scoured the internet, racked my brain for some interesting crafts.  Zeemaid actually sent me this cool link about making a clay pendant, but I never went to get the clay.  Mommy fail.  But I hope you enjoy the other crafts.  Keep in mind that the younger the child, the more work you need to do to help the child; while older children will be able to do more of the craft than I plan for.  My sons are two and four when they did these crafts.

If you’re looking for more Valentine’s Day Crafts, check out my other post.

Heart Lawn

(Nothing says love like grass, right?  Ok, you figure out how to grow roses from a sponge.  The boys LOVED dumping the grass seed on the sponges.  They are waiting anxiously for the grass to grow.  You can change the shape of the sponge to use any time.)

Things you need:

  • Sponge
  • Marker
  • Heart-shaped cookie cutter
  • Scissors
  • Water
  • Plate
  • Grass seed
  • Plastic wrap

Use the heart-shape cookie cutter to trace a heart on the sponge.  Cut out the heart.  Wet the sponge to make it damp.  Have the child pour grass seed onto the sponge.  You can use a bowl and spoon to make it less messy.  Cover the sponge with plastic wrap.  Check every few days to make sure the sponge is wet.  As soon as you see grass poking out, remove the plastic wrap.  In about two weeks, you should have a little grass lawn.

Sewing Heart Magnets

( I modified a craft I did in Girl Scouts all those years ago to make it easier on the boys.  And a tad less feminine.  That’s really the problem with a lot of Valentine crafts.  The boys enjoyed “sewing,” and Tornado E creatively made more of a net instead of going around the heart.  It turned out great, so let your child experiment.  I used a four inch cookie cutter.)

Things you need:

  • Red craft foam
  • Heart-shaped cookie cutter
  • Pen
  • Scissors
  • Hole punch
  • Ribbon ( we used white)
  • Tape
  • Magnet
  • Glue

You can buy pre-cut foam craft hearts, or you can make your own.  Trace a heart-shaped cookie cutter on the read foam.  Cut out the heart.  Hole punch around the heart.  For younger kids, make fewer holes.  Cut the piece of ribbon to two to three feet.  Tape the end to make it a needle, making it easier for younger children to sew with it.  Tape the other end on the back of the heart.  Have the child sew in and out of the holes.  (My son is two, and I held the heart so he could put it in the hole; then I turned it over, and he pulled the ribbon tight.)  After the child is done sewing, tape the end to the back.  For older children you can have the ends meet in the front in a bow.  Glue a magnet on the back.

3-D Heart Flowers

(I modified a Martha Stewart craft for this one.  I hope she doesn’t mind.  The boys thought it was really fun.  If you would like, have the child decorate the hearts before making the flower.)

Things you need:

  • Red, pink or white construction paper
  • Heart-shaped cookie cutter
  • Pen
  • Scissors
  • Hole punch
  • Pony bead
  • Pipe cleaner

Trace the heart-shaped cookie cutter on the construction paper, making four to six hearts.  Cut out the hearts.  Hole punch the hearts at the tip of the heart.  Have the child thread the pony bead onto the pipe cleaner, leaving about an inch of pipe cleaner above the bead.  Bend the pipe cleaner down and twist, securing the bead at the top of the pipe cleaner.  Have the child thread the hearts (how many the child wants) onto the pipe cleaner to the top under the pony bead.  Knot the pipe cleaner underneath the hearts.  Have the child spread the hearts to form a flower.

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Winter and Indoor Crafts for Kids, Preschoolers, and Toddlers

Many of you are stuck inside right now and have been for a while.  So I thought this would be a great time to do some craft ideas.  These crafts can be used for all ages, just adjust how much you do for the ability of the child.  Older kids can do more; younger kids can do less.

Chalk Snow Scene

(Some of you might remember that I did this last year too, but I figured it was worth the repeat.  Both boys got into this although they made blizzards.)

Things you need:

  • White chalk
  • Blue or black construction paper
  • Hairspray (optional)

Have the child draw a snow scene on the construction paper.  Spray hairspray to “glue” on the chalk if you want to keep it around for a while.

Variation:

The child can color with all colors of chalk on white paper, teaching him/her about impressionism.

Epsom Salt Snow Scene

(So why not make a 3D snow scene?  This can be messy.  Tornado S really didn’t care to participate, so he just did a few dots.  Tornado E went crazy.  The scenes turned out very cute.)

Things you need:

  • Blue or black construction paper
  • Glue
  • Epsom salt
  • Glitter (optional)

Have the child make a snow scene with the glue.  Let the child pour Epsom salt onto the glue.  If you want to make it extra special, let the child add glitter.

Variation:

Using silver glitter glue, let the child create a starry scene with blue or black construction paper.

Shells

(Some of you are sick and tired of snow, so let’s pretend to be on a beach with shells.  These were a lot of fun and clever.  The boys enjoyed them.  I only tried markers and glitter glue as mediums, but I’m sure you can do so much more.  I’ll try more and let you know unless you beat me to the punch.)

Things you need:

  • Large pasta shells (uncooked)
  • Markers
  • Glitter glue (optional)

Have the child decorate the shells, telling him/her how each shell is different.

Another fun thing to do is allow your child to color on a window with dry erase markers.  As an added bonus, my boys love to clean windows, taking turns spraying the window with window cleaner and rubbing it down with paper towel.

Christmas crafts for kids, preschoolers and toddlers part 2

Here are a few crafts we’re working on at Faemom’s.  All crafts are kid friendly.  Depending on the age and the ability of the child will depend on how much the child can and how much you do.  Stay tune because I’m still working on hot coco mix, dipped cookies, shell ornaments, pine cone ornaments, and decorative candles.

Applesauce Cinnamon Ornaments

I know.  I know.  I published this last year, but I never got around to doing them last year.  I did do them two years ago.  So I did them this year, and I learned a lot more. Tornado E (4) and Tornado S (2) helped mix the clay, roll the clay, and cut the clay with cookie cutters.  This is an easy recipe to multiply or divide.

Things you need:

½ cup applesauce

½ cup and 2tbs of cinnamon (this doesn’t have to be exact.  I just found I needed a little more cinnamon to make it less sticky.)

Bowl

Spoon

Wax paper

Rolling pin

Cookie cutters

Straw

Ribbon

Mix the applesauce and cinnamon.  You want a clay consistency, not too sticky, not too dry.  Roll the clay out in between two sheets of wax paper.  Roll it to a ½ in to 1/3 in thickness.  Too thick and it’ll take forever to dry.  Too thin and you can’t get it off the wax paper.  Cut out shapes with the cookie cutter.  Use the straw to make a hole for the ribbon.  Carefully remove the ornament with a knife and your fingers.  (This is when you realize it’s too thin or sticky.)  Move the ornament to a fresh piece of wax paper to dry.  (Because we’re in cramp quarters I placed mine on a wax papered cookie sheet, so they could be easily moved away from little hands at any time.)  If you need to leave the project, you can save the clay in a plastic container with a lid in the fridge for at least a week.  Let the shapes dry for two to three days.  Thread a ribbon through the hole and tie.

Metal Juice Lid Ornaments

I made these in Girl Scouts years ago.  Then I saw it online last year, and I thought it was a nifty idea.  Of course, you have to have metal juice lids, which can take some time to collect.  This is defiantly an older kid project.

Things you need:

Metal juice lids

A small wood board

A nail

A hammer

Ribbon

Marker (optional)

If you like, you can draw the dots of on the lid before you nail.  You can see the marker after you’re done, but mine looked better than when I free-handed it.  (Of course, that could just be me.)  Put the lid on the board.  Place the nail over the lid near the top.  Hammer the nail through the lid.  Since this is where you’ll run the ribbon, you might want to make this your biggest hole.  Continue to make holes of the design you want.  I made initials.  When finished, thread the ribbon through the top hole and tie.  (I am curious to see if these can be painted or polished, which will be an experiment for another time.)

Chocolate Dipped Spoons  with Marshmallows

I saw this somewhere in an old craft magazine.  Since I couldn’t find the magazine again, I just winged it.  Children can help dipping the spoons.  Because mine kept trying to eat the chocolate, they were forced out of the kitchen.

Things you need:

Plastic spoons

Melting chocolate (you can go with chocolate chips, but I went and bought chocolate made for making candies)

Bowl or jar

Wax paper

Plate or cookie sheet

Mini marshmallows

Different colored chocolate (optional)

Spoon or chocolate bag (optional)

Melt the chocolate according to the directions on the bag.  I prefer the double broiler method because I’ve burnt chocolate before (not good).  Dip the spoon to cover the bowl part of the spoon.  Wipe the back of the spoon against the bowl or jar to get excess chocolate off the back.  Place the spoon on the wax paper covered plate or cookie sheet (depending how much room you have in your freezer).  Place marshmallow into chocolate.  Repeat with other spoons until plate or cookie sheet are covered.  Place in freezer until chocolate is hard (anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes).  Dip spoons in chocolate again.  Place back on the plate and back into the freezer.  If you would like, you can melt more chocolate like white or colored to drizzle on the spoons.  When spoons are hardened, dip them for a third time in the chocolate.  If you want to, drizzle the chocolate over the chocolate spoons.  Put into freezer until hard.

This can be done without the marshmallow as well.  You can also flavor the chocolate too.

Gingerbread Men Ornaments

Every year I like to make an ornament with the boys.  This year we’re doing two.  This is the first one.  Both boys, at 4 and 2, were able to do this and had a lot of fun doing it.  I’m sure an 18 month old would be able to make these too.

Things you need:

Brown craft foam (I bet this would work with felt or brown paper)

Gingerbread man cookie cutter or template

Pen

Scissors

Craft foam stickers, markers, crayons, fabric paint, paint, glue, glitter, whatever you want to decorate with.  All things I have mentioned will work.

Hole puncher

Ribbon

Trace the gingerbread cookie cutter or template on the craft foam.  Cut out the gingerbread man.  You may punch the hole for the ribbon now or after the gingerbread man is decorated.  Have the child decorate the gingerbread man.  (Since my boys wouldn’t put eyes on if I didn’t do it, I did that with craft foam dots.)  Punch hole for the ribbon if you haven’t yet done so.  Thread ribbon through the hole and tie.

 

Pipe Cleaner Candy Canes

This is something we did do last year.  Like three days before Christmas.  I thought if I posted crafts three days before Christmas, someone would shoot me.  But you have to keep young hands busy somehow or else they would be wrecking the tree, getting into the presents, finding the presents, opening up the cookies meant for Christmas. Tornado E was three, and Tornado S was eighteen months.  Tornado E could do both kinds of candy canes.  Tornado S did better with stringing the beads as long as I held the pipe cleaner.

Type 1

Things you need:

Red pipe cleaners

White pipe cleaners (You could use green if you like.)

Take the pipe cleaners and twist them together.  Then take the pipe cleaners and form a hook to make it look like a candy cane.

Type 2

Things you need:

Red or white pipe cleaners

Red or white or green pony beads (whatever color is opposite of your pipe cleaner)

Take the pipe cleaner and thread the pony beads on it, leaving space in between to look like stripes.  Take the pipe cleaner and form a hook to make it look like a candy cane.

Need more ideas?  Check out my other posts on Christmas and winter crafts for kids.

Christmas Crafts for Kids, Toddlers, and Babies

More Christmas Crafts for Children, Toddlers, and Babies

Winter and Christmas Crafts for Toddlers and Children

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Halloween Choices

I’ve been remissed lately about the crafts, not just with you, but with the boys too.  Last year I had all kinds of crafts for people to do.  This year, um, not so much.  See, apparently when I get morning sickness, I prefer to let the boys learn from watching Mickey as I lay on the bed, telling my breakfast to stay put as I reread the adventures of Bella and Edward to keep my mind from questioning my sanity over deciding to get pregnant again.  This allows little to no time for crafts.  And Halloween is in a few days.  I’m sorry.  I suck.  I know.

But before I could become a fat (I know hard to do when I can’t keep my calories down), lazy slob in a hammock, yelling “Tornado E, get Mommy her prying bar; easy does it, easy, sugar” (nod to those who got that reference), I got my energy back.  Hallelujah!  So we made glue ghosts, which are more glitter than glue.  I plan on shaping some rice krispies bars into ghosts tomorrow.  Saturday my mom and I are planning a special Halloween dinner with scary face sloppy joes, ghost cheese bread, and bugs.  We still haven’t figured out desert.  I’m thinking brownie coffins again.

Last year I made ghost toast because Tornado E had a fever, so I had to forgo making ghost pancakes.  I cut their sandwiches with Halloween cookie cutters, but they didn’t eat them.  For dinner, I made a cheese pizza, using cheddar cheese so that I could use string cheese to make the web.  I made the ghost cheese bread out of refrigerated crescent dough, shaping the triangles into ghost shapes.  I made brownies that I cut into coffin shapes, iced, and then frosted a little cross on the top of each one.  I do this to make up for not being able to throw another large, outrageous Halloween party.

This year, I decided Tornado S should go as a pirate.  Sure, I should have asked.  I asked Tornado E at this age, and he wanted to be Robin Hood.  But I figured Tornado S is obsessed with pirates, so he would love a pirate costume.  Do you have any idea how hard it is to find a white button up shirt for a 2t boy?  No one has them.  I even went to a brunch of second hand stores.  Finally I settled on a size 4/5, since we all know pirates wore baggy clothes any ways.  I bought some dark grey sweatpants that I cut into a zig-zag pattern just below Tornado S’s knees.  My mom made Tornado S a black vest, and she found some gaudy button covers for him.  I cut him a red sash, tied a red bandana on his head, and placed a foam pirate’s hat on his head.  He loved the costume.

Remember last year when Tornado E decided two months out that he wanted to be a witch.  This year he couldn’t make up his mind.  He wanted to be a bat, a vampire, a green monster, a stick of gum, Halloween candy, a doctor, a rubber chicken, the chicken from Surf’s Up, a bubble gum machine, an alien.  At some point, I realized an Uncle was involved somewhere and told them to shut the f up.  So when we went to Wal-Mart, I told Tornado E he had to pick one thing.  My mom was looking at those cheap t-shirt costumes. Tornado E picked the devil shirt, but since it had a corset, I thought I would make our own.  We went into the boy department and picked up a red turtle-neck and red sweats.  As I browsed the costume department for horns and a tail, which only came as a girl set, my mom and Tornado E argued because Tornado E had chosen something else, something store bought.  I think he wanted to be Darth Vader.  The kid has a wicked impression.  I broke up the fight and dragged Tornado E to the cash register with him calling me.

What?

I don’t want to be a devil anymore.

What do you want to be?

Ummmm, a transformer!

No.

When we returned home, I ripped off the feathers off the horns and placed them on Tornado E’s head, who laughed in delight, begging to wear his costume, which I obliged.  He was excited to be Mommy-what’s-it-called-again a devil.

The next day he was wearing the shirt and pants with the tail still pinned to it before I even got out of bed.  Today he was a dragon.  Whatever.

Then Tuesday we were going to the special Halloween story time.  I dressed Tornado S up first.  Then I turned to Tornado E who decided he was going as a pirate too.  What?!  Are you kidding?! He calmly told me he could wear his pirate costume.  I should have said yes, but I have pride in my craftiness, so I couldn’t allow my son to go to Halloween in a store bought piece of crap.  I said no.  We argued.  I called for backup.  My mom wasn’t home, and my dad said he didn’t know.  Thanks.  I turned to Tornado E and gave him a choice.  Vampire or devil?

Vampire.

Because this was the option thrown around most, I knew what I was going to do.  I pulled out his ring bearer tux.  I put him in his pants, shirt and white vest.  I used baby powder to whiten his face (because it doesn’t over do it like the costume make up).  Unfortunately when we moved, I went through all my make-up and threw out my unused lipsticks, costume make up and such, so the only lipstick I had was the one I actually use (from time to time when I have to be all “adult”).  Oh, well.  Then I put his black witch’s cape from last Halloween on him.  Bam.  Traditional vampire.  Except his hair was messed up like the newest, most popular, and arguably best looking vampire, and I didn’t have the heart to slick it back.  Actually I debated on throwing on some glitter (because I have tubes of that stuff).  But I refrained.

Tornado E loved it.  But at the end of story time, he had taken the pirate hat and was calling himself a musketeer.  Whatever.

Then yesterday when he talked to the triplet’s mom, and she asked what he was going to be for Halloween.  He proudly said a devil and described his costume.

Whatever.  I’m done.

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Pink Cocoa Cuplets

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I’m not big on fall.  In fact as a child, I kind of dreaded it.  School got harder in the fall.  I anticipated winter mornings in plaid skirt and knee-highs, standing in assembly in frozen grass, wondering why God was punishing me.  But worst of all was the yearly trip to cut firewood.

Starting as an infant, I was dragged out of my bed, dressed, and pushed into a truck long before sunrise, which is fairly inhuman when you’re not a morning person.  We would drive out an hour outside of town to meet my grandparents at the exit, just a little after dawn.  Then we would drive and drive until we were into the foothills of the Santa Ritas.  We would find a place to park, and then my dad and grandpa would start cutting marked scrawny oak trees.  If luck was with us, they would find good trees uphill.  Usually luck wasn’t with us.

As a baby, they had me in a playpen.  They joked every year that I cried whenever the sound of the chainsaws stopped.  She was meant to do this, they said.  I called it slave labor.  They forced me to go all the way until I was in college.  Then my grandpa would joke about flying me home just to help.  Ha.  Ha.  Ha.

Some years it was hot, but you couldn’t remove your jeans or flannel shirt to get cool.  Some years it was freezing, and you kept moving to get warm.  Thankfully, I have repressed the memory of the year it snowed.  There was the year of the baby mice, curled up tight in a nest.  The year of the horny toads, spitting blood when you pressed on them.  The year of the chiggers.  God, that was a bad year. 

There was only one good thing about cutting wood.  It was lunch.  The adults believed in getting done before lunch.  If it was a bad season of only scrawny oak trees marked, then lunch was an hour rest or so.

My grandma made the most perfect submarine sandwiches.  Each one specific to the person it was intended for.  She made deviled eggs that were heavenly.  She brought enough snacks and lemonade for an army.  But the best part was Pink-Cocoa Cuplets for desert.

These are an excellent travel desert because there is no frosting and they are not messy.  They get there name for the pink center from the Cocoa.  Trust me, men and boys love them too, even if they’re pink.  It’s been a couple of years since I had one.  So I might have to make these soon.

Pink- Cocoa Cuplets

2 c flour
1 T cocoa
1 t salt
1 ¼ c sugar
¾ c shortening
2 eggs
1 t vanilla
1 t baking soda
1 c cold water

Topping
1cup semi-chocolate chips
½ c chopped nuts

Preheat oven 375.
Sift together the flower, cocoa, salt, and baking soda. Add other dry ingredients slowly. Blend res of ingredients well. Line muffin tin with baking cups. Fill muffin cups. Sprinkle chocolate chips and nuts over the top. Bake for 20-25 minutes. Makes 24 cupcakes.

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Father’s Day Crafts!

Father’s Day is coming next Sunday, and I have been wacking my brain to come up with some great craft ideas.  If I had had a muse, I would have had this out last week, like I WANTED to, but my dad is hard to shop for; my husband is hard to shop for; my father-in-law is hard to shop for.  If it wasn’t for this blog, I would have gift carded the whole affair. 

Last year, we made t-shirts that said “You’re the best Dad (Papi) (Papa) hands down.”  I then put the boys’ handprints on the shirt with their names and ages underneath. 

Another tradition I started last year due to reading a Family Fun issue was to take a picture of the boys every year in the shirt (or outfit) their dad wore on the day of their birth.  Fortunately the husband wore the same shirt for both births.  Unfortunately I found it in a pile of dirty clothes last year.  I wonder where it is now.

This year I plan on making my dad chocolate cookies for Father’s Day.  I’m sure the boys would love to help.  We also did a few crafts.

 

Picture Frames

(This is a great craft with lots of variety.  The boys and I did this one last year.  They had a blast.  The husband loved it.)

What you need:

  • Unfinished thick picture frame (the thicker the better to give room for toddler creativity)
  • black or white paint
  • finger paints
  • paint brushes
  • sealer or top coat
  • sand paper
  • smock

First sand and prep the picture frame.  Next paint the background color with white or black paint.  Once the background paint is dry, have the child paint the frame.  After the painting is dry, paint the sealer or clear top coat to protect the painting.

Variations:

For older children, a regular unfinished frame works well too.

The child can stain the frame.

The child can paint it black and the sponge paint it with gold, silver, or any other favorite color.

The child can paint it black and put stickers on it.  Glow-in-the-dark stars look really cool.

The child can paint it a solid color and glue rocks, shells or buttons on the frame.

The child can decoupage the frame with material, color paper, magazine articles.

 

Craft Foam Picture Frame

(I was trying to find a twist on the picture frame idea because grandparents and parents just love pictures.  The boys really liked decorating the frames.  Evan had a unique twist on the stickers as he used Halloween spiders.)

Things you need:

  • Craft foam
  • Scissors
  • Pen
  • Markers, stickers, anything you want to decorate with
  • Glue (craft or hot)
  • Picture
  • Magnets

Trace out a square for the picture on the craft foam.  Cut out the square.  (I left an inch and a half around the picture for the frame.)  Have the child decorate the craft foam.  Glue the picture in the frame.  Glue magnets on the back of the frame.  (I picked up decorative magnets for a buck at Michael’s.)

 

Magnet Artwork

(I have read several places about taking those magnet business cards and doing something with them, like gluing pictures on them.  I decided on art work for the boys to do.  As my b0ys love coloring and stickering, they enjoyed doing this.)

Things you need:

  • Business magnets
  • Craft foam or construction paper
  • Markers, stickers, anything else you want to decorate with
  • Scissors
  • Black marker
  • Glue (craft or hot)

Trace the business magnets on the craft foam or construction paper with the black marker.  Have the child decorate the shape.  Cut the shape out.  Glue to the magnet.  (I have also heard of moms who make a scan of the child’s artwork and print it in business card size.  This would work for the magnets too.)

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Summer Crafts!

I know it’s not summer yet, but it sure feels like it.  Then again, no one is in school in this house to remind me that summer is still some time away.  But I thought I would get a jump on summer craft ideas.  This is only the beginning as I keep thinking about tie-dying with the boys.  Yup, I’ll probably end up dying them for a few days, since I once dyed my hands for a weekend, which angered my mom quite a bit and I had to wear gloves to church.  And I’m working on some yummy summer treats to make with the kids.  So stay tuned.  Also you can see pictures of these and other crafts at my other blog: Faemom’s Crafts.

 

Painting Pots

(Nothing like a little gardening to get the kids interested in the great outdoors and possibly vegetables.  Before I dug a hole, I thought the boys would like to paint their own special pot.  This would also make a great gift.  The boys loved doing this.)

Things you need:

  • Terra Cotta Pot
  • Primer
  • White paint
  • Washable paint
  • Paint brushes
  • Smock
  • Sealer (optional)

 

Primer the pot, and then paint it white (or any color you or your child would prefer as the background). Allow the pot to dry.  Have the child paint the pot with the washable paints.  Allow the pot to dry.  If you want this work of art to last, seal the pot.

 

Planting

(I don’t know one kid who doesn’t like getting dirty.  For young children, like my boys, I would recommend starting out with a plant; while, older kids have more patience and would enjoy starting a plant from seed.)

Things you need:

  • A pot
  • Potting soil
  • Pebbles
  • A plant or seeds
  • A small shovel
  • Water

Have the child cover the bottom of the pot with pebbles to allow good drainage.  Then have the child shovel the soil half way in the pot.  Have the child place the plant or seeds in the pot.  Have the child fill the pot with soil with the shovel or hands.  Water the plant as needed.  (Encourage your child to talk and sing to the plant as this will help the plant grow better.)

 

Lily Pad boats

( I got this idea at this website, but I decided not to float tea candles on them.  I thought we could float frogs, which worked out well.  The boys loved them!  I made a few of them testing out with different glues.  Don’t use school glue, unless it’s a one time use.  Craft glue and hot glue worked well.  Craft glue gets a little soggy, but it will re-adhere when dried.)

Things you need:

¨      2 sheets Green craft foam

¨      A CD

¨      Scissors

¨      A pen

¨      Hot glue gun with glue or craft glue

¨      A toy to sail the boat, preferably a frog

Trace the CD on both pieces of craft foam.  Cut out the circles.  Cut out a triangle out of the circles (best to do it with one circle on top of the other), forming the lily pad.  Glue the lily pads together.  Allow the glue to dry.  Take the lily pads out to the pool or bath.

 

Butterfly Kites

(I got this idea off of Family Fun.  But I decided to do it using coffee filters, which was more fun and messy.  The boys loved building these and playing with them.  It makes walking to get the mail more fun.)

Things you need:

  • Smock
  • 2 coffee filters
  • Markers
  • Bowl of water
  • Paint brush
  • Scissors
  • Pipe cleaner
  • Yarn

Have the child color the coffee filters with markers.  The more color, the more fun.  After the child is done decorating the filters, have the child paint them with water, making the colors run.  Let the filters dry.  Fold the filters in half to cut out half a butterfly making the wings even on both sides.  (I wish I could have found a template.)  Do not make a head or tail because the pipe cleaner will do that.  Have the child fold the pipe cleaner in half and slip the butterfly wings between it.  Cross the ends of the pipe cleaner to form antenna.  You can bend them into little nubs if you like.  Tie a piece of yarn to the pipe cleaner, long enough to fly the kite behind the child.  If the child wants to flutter the kite, tie two short pieces of yarn to the pipe cleaner.

 

Other ideas:

Side walk painting with water.

Side walk painting with ice.

Chalk drawing on the fence.

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