Christmas ornaments for kids, preschoolers, and toddlers to make

Christmas is coming.  The goose is getting fat.  I love prepping for Christmas. Tornado E and I are brain storming for this year’s ornaments and crafts.  I’m not sure what to do for the families.  Here are some ornaments we made last year.  We had a blast making them.  Depending on the age and the ability of the child will depend on how much work you do.

Mini Christmas Trees

(I remember doing something similar when I was a Brownie in Girl Scouts. It’s an easy, fun, and messy project.  Tornado E (5) and Tornado S (3) really enjoyed making them.)

What you need:

Pine cones

Green spray paint

Glue

Glitter

Paper plates

Ribbon

Spray paint pine cones green.  Once the pine cones are dry, pour glue in one paper plate and glitter in another.  Have the child roll the pine cone in the glue and then in the glitter.  Let the pine cone dry.  Glue ribbon to the pine cone to make a loop.  Allow to dry.

Glitter Shells

(I saw this in a Martha Stewart magazine.  The hard part is putting a whole in the shell; you’ll need a drill, preferably a dremel drill.  It was easy to adopt for children.  I’m thinking I want to try other shells this year.  The boys loved making these.  I loved playing with my dad’s dremel drill.  If only I had a real reason to get one.)

Things you need:

Shells (We used clam shells)

Dremel Drill

Glue

Glitter

Paper plates

Tooth pick

Ribbon or string

Drill a hole in the top of the shell.  Have the child dip the shell into the glue.  Have the child cover the shell in glitter.  (We did most shells in one color as well as mixing two colors together to get a neat effect.)  Clear the hole of glue and glitter.  Allow to dry.  Thread the whole with ribbon or string.  Tie the ribbon to make a loop.

Clay Ornaments

(These are so easy, simple, and fun.  Toddlers can even do it.  Now that I think about it, I might have the boys make more this year and work on decorating them in different ways.  The boys had lots of fun.  Keep on eye on these.  They can burn quickly.  Tornado E prefered the burnt ones.  I was less than thrilled.)

What you need:

Polymer Clay

Something to cut clay in a circle (I used a plastic Easter egg.)

Rubber stamps

Straw

Cookie sheet

Tooth pick

Foil

Ribbon

Have the child knead the clay for at least two minutes.  (For younger children, you may have to work with it too.)  Roll the clay flat to about 1/4″ to 1/2″ thick.  Cut out circles.  Use the straw to cut out a hole in the top.  Have the child press a rubber stamp in to the clay.  On the back of the clay, write the child’s name or initials with the year.  Cover a cookie sheet with foil, and place the ornaments on it.  Bake in an oven or toaster oven as it says on the directions. (275°F for 15 mins.  I think mine baked in 10 mins.)  Let the ornaments cool.  String ornaments with ribbon.

More craft and ornament ideas

Christmas crafts for kids, preschoolers and toddlers part 2

Winter and Christmas Crafts for Toddlers and Children

More Christmas Crafts for Children, Toddlers, and Babies

Christmas Crafts for Kids, Toddlers, and Babies

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Christmas crafts for kids, preschoolers and toddlers part 2

Here are a few crafts we’re working on at Faemom’s.  All crafts are kid friendly.  Depending on the age and the ability of the child will depend on how much the child can and how much you do.  Stay tune because I’m still working on hot coco mix, dipped cookies, shell ornaments, pine cone ornaments, and decorative candles.

Applesauce Cinnamon Ornaments

I know.  I know.  I published this last year, but I never got around to doing them last year.  I did do them two years ago.  So I did them this year, and I learned a lot more. Tornado E (4) and Tornado S (2) helped mix the clay, roll the clay, and cut the clay with cookie cutters.  This is an easy recipe to multiply or divide.

Things you need:

½ cup applesauce

½ cup and 2tbs of cinnamon (this doesn’t have to be exact.  I just found I needed a little more cinnamon to make it less sticky.)

Bowl

Spoon

Wax paper

Rolling pin

Cookie cutters

Straw

Ribbon

Mix the applesauce and cinnamon.  You want a clay consistency, not too sticky, not too dry.  Roll the clay out in between two sheets of wax paper.  Roll it to a ½ in to 1/3 in thickness.  Too thick and it’ll take forever to dry.  Too thin and you can’t get it off the wax paper.  Cut out shapes with the cookie cutter.  Use the straw to make a hole for the ribbon.  Carefully remove the ornament with a knife and your fingers.  (This is when you realize it’s too thin or sticky.)  Move the ornament to a fresh piece of wax paper to dry.  (Because we’re in cramp quarters I placed mine on a wax papered cookie sheet, so they could be easily moved away from little hands at any time.)  If you need to leave the project, you can save the clay in a plastic container with a lid in the fridge for at least a week.  Let the shapes dry for two to three days.  Thread a ribbon through the hole and tie.

Metal Juice Lid Ornaments

I made these in Girl Scouts years ago.  Then I saw it online last year, and I thought it was a nifty idea.  Of course, you have to have metal juice lids, which can take some time to collect.  This is defiantly an older kid project.

Things you need:

Metal juice lids

A small wood board

A nail

A hammer

Ribbon

Marker (optional)

If you like, you can draw the dots of on the lid before you nail.  You can see the marker after you’re done, but mine looked better than when I free-handed it.  (Of course, that could just be me.)  Put the lid on the board.  Place the nail over the lid near the top.  Hammer the nail through the lid.  Since this is where you’ll run the ribbon, you might want to make this your biggest hole.  Continue to make holes of the design you want.  I made initials.  When finished, thread the ribbon through the top hole and tie.  (I am curious to see if these can be painted or polished, which will be an experiment for another time.)

Chocolate Dipped Spoons  with Marshmallows

I saw this somewhere in an old craft magazine.  Since I couldn’t find the magazine again, I just winged it.  Children can help dipping the spoons.  Because mine kept trying to eat the chocolate, they were forced out of the kitchen.

Things you need:

Plastic spoons

Melting chocolate (you can go with chocolate chips, but I went and bought chocolate made for making candies)

Bowl or jar

Wax paper

Plate or cookie sheet

Mini marshmallows

Different colored chocolate (optional)

Spoon or chocolate bag (optional)

Melt the chocolate according to the directions on the bag.  I prefer the double broiler method because I’ve burnt chocolate before (not good).  Dip the spoon to cover the bowl part of the spoon.  Wipe the back of the spoon against the bowl or jar to get excess chocolate off the back.  Place the spoon on the wax paper covered plate or cookie sheet (depending how much room you have in your freezer).  Place marshmallow into chocolate.  Repeat with other spoons until plate or cookie sheet are covered.  Place in freezer until chocolate is hard (anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes).  Dip spoons in chocolate again.  Place back on the plate and back into the freezer.  If you would like, you can melt more chocolate like white or colored to drizzle on the spoons.  When spoons are hardened, dip them for a third time in the chocolate.  If you want to, drizzle the chocolate over the chocolate spoons.  Put into freezer until hard.

This can be done without the marshmallow as well.  You can also flavor the chocolate too.

Gingerbread Men Ornaments

Every year I like to make an ornament with the boys.  This year we’re doing two.  This is the first one.  Both boys, at 4 and 2, were able to do this and had a lot of fun doing it.  I’m sure an 18 month old would be able to make these too.

Things you need:

Brown craft foam (I bet this would work with felt or brown paper)

Gingerbread man cookie cutter or template

Pen

Scissors

Craft foam stickers, markers, crayons, fabric paint, paint, glue, glitter, whatever you want to decorate with.  All things I have mentioned will work.

Hole puncher

Ribbon

Trace the gingerbread cookie cutter or template on the craft foam.  Cut out the gingerbread man.  You may punch the hole for the ribbon now or after the gingerbread man is decorated.  Have the child decorate the gingerbread man.  (Since my boys wouldn’t put eyes on if I didn’t do it, I did that with craft foam dots.)  Punch hole for the ribbon if you haven’t yet done so.  Thread ribbon through the hole and tie.

 

Pipe Cleaner Candy Canes

This is something we did do last year.  Like three days before Christmas.  I thought if I posted crafts three days before Christmas, someone would shoot me.  But you have to keep young hands busy somehow or else they would be wrecking the tree, getting into the presents, finding the presents, opening up the cookies meant for Christmas. Tornado E was three, and Tornado S was eighteen months.  Tornado E could do both kinds of candy canes.  Tornado S did better with stringing the beads as long as I held the pipe cleaner.

Type 1

Things you need:

Red pipe cleaners

White pipe cleaners (You could use green if you like.)

Take the pipe cleaners and twist them together.  Then take the pipe cleaners and form a hook to make it look like a candy cane.

Type 2

Things you need:

Red or white pipe cleaners

Red or white or green pony beads (whatever color is opposite of your pipe cleaner)

Take the pipe cleaner and thread the pony beads on it, leaving space in between to look like stripes.  Take the pipe cleaner and form a hook to make it look like a candy cane.

Need more ideas?  Check out my other posts on Christmas and winter crafts for kids.

Christmas Crafts for Kids, Toddlers, and Babies

More Christmas Crafts for Children, Toddlers, and Babies

Winter and Christmas Crafts for Toddlers and Children

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Winter and Christmas Crafts for Toddlers and Children

A few more winter crafts as Southern California is pillaged by a storm.  Ok, greatly exaggerated, but cold rain means no going outside.  No going outside means tornadoes on the loose inside.  I would like to dedicate these crafts to Outside Voice as she said “Just the thought of buying all the things you need for each one tires me out!” on my last craft post.  I expect most of you have these items around the house.

 

Gingerbread Men

(My sons are crazy about Gingerbread Men; I don’t know if it’s because I made some last week or that we are watching too much Shrek.  We used crayons and fabric paint to decorate them, but you can use a variety of different mediums.  Evan loved squirting the fabric paint, making a Santa Clause and elves.  If you don’t have a cookie cutter, then try this page for a template.  I actually liked the medium ones better than my cookie cutter.  http://www.first-school.ws/activities/fairytales/gingerbread-man-boy.htm)

 

Things you need:

  • Cardboard or brown construction paper
  • Gingerbread man cookie cutter or template
  • Black marker or pen
  • Scissors
  • Crayons, markers, fabric paint, finger paint, glitter glue, white out, (whatever you want to decorate with)

 

Trace the cookie cutter or template on the cardboard or construction paper.  Cut out pattern.  Let the child decorate the gingerbread man.

 

 

Snow Scene

(We did this in Girl Scouts; the girls loved it.  My boys loved it.   Watch toddlers carefully as they are known to eat chalk.)

 

Things you need:

  • Black paper
  • White chalk
  • Hair spray

 

Let the child draw a snowy scene with the chalk, making hills, snowflakes and snowmen to create the scene.  When the child is finish, spray it with hair spray to keep the picture.  If you don’t have hair spray, the picture will fade away eventually.

 

 

Snowflakes

(Just because sometimes we can’t think out of the box, let’s remember how much fun it was to cut out snowflakes.  Of course, my boys were too little to cut them, but they had fun playing with them and hanging them up.)

 

Things you need:

  • White paper
  • Scissors
  • Bowl (optional)
  • Pen (optional)

 

If you want circle snowflakes, trace the bowl and cut out the circle.  Fold the paper as many times as you like as the more you fold the more complicated the pattern.  Cut.  Cut squares, triangles, circles, and random shapes.  Unfold the paper.

More Christmas Crafts for Children, Toddlers, and Babies

I worked on some more crafts and ornaments with the boys.  The handprint tiles and dishtowels can work with babies too, but baby handprints are hard to do.  Older children can do more of the work like making the applesauce ornaments on their own.

 

I thought I would mention some other gift ideas too.  Every year I give out the jar mixes to couples and families.  They’re a real cute gift, and you’re giving them the gift of time to spend with each other baking and eating.  This is a great site: http://www.razzledazzlerecipes.com/christmas/gifts/index.htm.  The people I have given these to love them.  This is also a great gift to make with children.  I have also made candles and soaps.  With the soaps I added a little toy in the middle for a neat surprise.  One year I added charms to the candles. 

 

Here is a great site for homemade ornamets: http://familyfun.go.com/arts-and-crafts/season/specialfeature/christmas-ornaments-ms/.  I Plan on making the Festive Paper Pines for my soon-to-be sister-in-law.

A warning: DO NOT MAKE THE CANDY GLASS ORNAMENTS!  I did this last year, and the ornaments got sticky before I was even able to give them away.  They messed up gifts, and it was horrible.

 

 

Applesauce Ornaments

(I had a lot of fun making these last year, and I plan to make more this year.  Hopefully Evan will be big enough to help me.  These look so cute, and they smell so nice.  These take up to three days to dry)

 

Things you need:

  • ½ cup of cinnamon
  • ½ cup of applesauce
  • Bowl
  • Wax paper
  • Cookie cutters
  • Straw
  • Ribbon
  • Rolling pin (optional)
  • Wire rack (optional)

 

Mix the applesauce and cinnamon together.  It will become very stiff.  Roll into a boll and place on the wax paper.  You can either flatten it with your hand or use another sheet of wax paper and a rolling pin.  Flatten to ¼ to 1/8 of an inch.  (The thicker it is the longer it takes to dry, but it’s hardier.)  Using the cookie cutters, cut out shapes.  Use the straw to make a hole for the ribbon.  If you have a wire rack, place the ornaments there as they will dry quicker, or you can leave them on some wax paper.  They will turn a lighter brown as they dry.  String with ribbon, and tie the ribbon.

 

 

Contact Paper Ornaments

(The boys and I did these yesterday.  We tried glitter and confetti, but those did not work out.  The boys had fun.  Sean really liked putting the paper down.   If you have any of the dyed coffee filters left over {See craft section if you have no idea what I’m talking about}, they look great as collage strips.)

 

Things you need:

  • Clear contact paper
  • Cookie cutters
  • Marker
  • Scissors
  • Colored tissue paper or other nice paper
  • Hole punch
  • Ribbon
  • Markers, glitter glue (optional)

 

Trace the cookie cutter shapes on the contact paper.  Cut the tissue paper into squares or shapes.  Allow the child to place the paper on the sticky contact paper.  When the child is done decorating, seal the artwork with another piece of contact paper.  Cut out the shape.  Punch a hole in the top.  If you wish, the child can decorate the top of the ornament.  String a piece of ribbon through the hole, and tie the ribbon.

 

 

Handprint Hot Plates

(We did this the other day.  We used ink because it shows the detail of the handprint, but you can use washable paint {That would come off easier than the washable ink}.  Don’t forget to write the child’s name and date.  Or if your child can write his or her name, let he or she do it.  I got the idea from here:

http://stepbystepcc.com/toddlercrafts.html.)

 

Things you need:

  • Ceramic tile 6×6
  • Washable ink or washable paint
  • Sealer or enamel spray
  • Magic marker
  • Felt feet (optional)

 

Paint the child’s hand with ink or paint.  Place the child’s hand on the tile.  Allow for the handprint to dry.  Write the child’s name on the tile.  Seal the time.  You can put felt feet on the bottom of the tile to protect it.

 

 

Handprint Dish Towels

(These were really cute.  And any excuse to get their hands wet is good enough for the boys.  I thought these matched well with the tiles.  And I can’t find the site I got this from, but I’ll keep looking.)

 

Things you need:

  • White dish towels
  • Fabric paint
  • Paper plate or pie tin

 

Wash the dish towels.  Paint the child’s hand with the fabric paint or dip the child’s hand into the paint on the plate.  Place the child’s hand on the dish towel.  You can do both hands or make a boarder.  Write the name and date.  Allow the towels to dry.

 

 

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Christmas Crafts for Kids, Toddlers, and Babies

Because Christmas is coming around the corner and we’re all trying to figure out what to do, I thought I would throw out some suggestions of things I’ve done in the past with my boys.  Some of these can be down with babies as well as older children.  In a week or so, I’ll make some new holiday gifts with the boys, and I’ll post those too.

 

Paper Ornaments

(Nothing is better than home-made ornaments.  These are simple and easy.  Perfect for toddlers.  For older children, use glue and glitter to decorate.  Grandparents are suckers for these sort of things.  Evan loved doing this last year.)

 

Things you need:

 

  • Construction paper
  • Christmas cookie cutters
  • Pen
  • Scissors
  • Hole puncher
  • Ribbon
  • Crayons, markers, glue, glitter (whatever you want to decorate with)

 

Trace the cookie cutters with a pen on the construction paper.  Cut the shape out.  Have the child decorate the shapes.  Punch a hole in the top and string with ribbon.  Don’t forget to mark the year and the child’s name on the back.

 

 

Lid Ornaments

(I haven’t done this with Evan yet, but I remember doing them when I was four and loved it.  My mom still has mine hanging on the tree every year)

 

Things you need:

 

  • Plastic lids (from butter containers or sour cream containers or any top)
  • Hole puncher
  • Old Christmas cards or magazines
  • Scissors
  • Ribbon
  • Glue

 

Have the child cut out (or if it is a toddler, cut it out for the child) a picture of Christmas.  Let the child glue the picture on the lid.  Punch a hole in the lid and string it with some ribbon.  Don’t forget to mark the year and the child’s name on the ornament.

 

 

Footprints and Handprints

(When Evan was a baby, I inked up his feet and put down footprints that I decorated and framed for my parents and in-laws.  They loved it.  You can either frame the footprints or handprints or you can make them into ornaments.)

 

Things you need:

 

  • White paper
  • Washable ink pad
  • Wet wash cloth or wipes
  • Hole punch, scissor, ribbon (if you make the ornament)

 

Just ink the feet or hands (on young babies, hands are difficult).  Then place the inked hand or foot onto the paper.  Wash the hand or foot right away for nothing else gets decorated. 

 

 

Handprint Shirt

(The last time we did this, Evan loved it, and Sean was too little to remember, but we plan on doing it again.  I looked online for clever shirt sayings.  Our favorite: “You’re the best (fill in here)!  Hands Down!”  We also put the ages and names of the boys underneath their hand prints.  My dad loves his shirt.)

 

Things you need:

 

  • Shirt
  • Fabric paint
  • Cardboard
  • Wipes

 

(If you don’t like the raise look of fabric paint writing, water down the fabric paint a little bit and use a brush or pencil to write the saying.)

 

Place the cardboard inside the shirt to keep the paint from bleeding through.  Write the clever saying with the fabric paint.  Allow it to dry.  Then dip the child’s hands into the paint, making sure it’s nice and even, and place the hands on the shirt.  Wipe the child’s hands immediately.  Allow the hand prints to dry, and write the name and age of the child.

 

Picture Frame

 

(I did this for a gift.  The boys loved painting the frame and showing it off later.  I used the black paint as the background color.  I had them paint on newspaper on the floor.)

 

What you need:

 

·      Unfinished thick picture frame (the thicker the better to give room for toddler creativity)

·      black or white paint

·      finger paints

·      paint brushes

·      sealer or top coat

·      sand paper

·      smock

 

First sand and prep the picture frame.  Next paint the background color with white or black paint.  Once the background paint is dry, have the child paint the frame.  After the painting is dry, paint the sealer or clear top coat to protect the painting.

 

Check out these posts for more Christmas and winter craft ideas:

More Christmas crafts

Winter and Christmas crafts

Christmas Crafts for kids, preschoolers, and toddlers part 2