There’s a Wocket in my Pocket!

Evan: Mommy, are you ever certain there’s a ghair on your chair?

 

Me: (washing dishes without looking up) Sometimes.

 

Evan: Mommy, is there a ghair on your chair?

 

Me: (looking up to see Evan draped on the top of my wing-backed chair) Why, I do believe there is a ghair on my chair.

 

*an hour later*

The boys are watching TV, and I read my book.

 

Evan: Is there a ghair on your chair?

 

Me: (looking up, smiling) Yes, there is a ghair on the chair.

 

Evan: Is that a bofa on the sofa?

 

Me: (Realizing I’m the only one on the sofa) Yes, I’m the bofa on the sofa.

 

Evan: Do you ever get the feeling there’s a B.T. watching T.V?

 

Me: (Looking at Sean, standing, mesmerized by Kai-Lan) Yes, I do have the feeling there’s a B.T. watching TV.

 

*a few days later and several more ghairs on the chairs*

 

Evan: Mommy.  There’s a sick ghair on your chair.

 

Me: I know, big guy, and he’ll be well soon.

 

 

 

“I don’t care

If you believe it.

That’s the kind of house

I live in.

And I hope

We never leave it.”

-Dr. Seuss

 

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Books I Want My Kids to Read One Day

Here’s a list of ten books I want my boys to read and hopefully enjoy.  I hope everyone does their own list and lets me know because I would love suggestions.  When my husband was a boy, his father read to him every night, starting with picture books and going into books like The Hobbit.  So everyone find some time to do the list (looking at you, Outside Voice), and no cheating by putting The Bible, The Torah, The Qur’an because we ALL want our kids to read our religious texts.  That goes for homework too. ( I like to say for the record that when ever I publish this post, WordPress helpfully removes all the italics and bullet points.)
 

Hungry, Hungry Sharks by Joanne Cole.  Ok, I’m a bit sentimental with this book because it was the first book I read by myself.  I would like my kids to read it so they’re not scared of sharks and know that you can find all the answers in books

 

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle.  I hated reading when I was growing up; it was this book that made me change my mind.  It was a great story and theme, and if they like this one, they’ll want to finish the series.

 

Greek myths (or The Iliad or The Odyssey by Homer) I loved reading mythology growing up.  Reading the Greek myths especially will give my kids a frame work to understanding Western literature, art, music, and even thought.

 

Dracula by Bram Stoker (or Frankenstein’s Monster by Mary Shelley {or Little Women by Louisa May Alcott or Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë if I have a girl})  Since I wasn’t a reader, I was completely against the thought of reading the classics, but luckily I had a teacher who was determined to make us readers.  The whole idea is if you can get them to like a classic, you can get them to read more in search for another good book.

 

Go Ask Alice by Anonymous.  This book is always on the top ten banned list.  It is a moving diary of a teenage female drug addict.  It scared me straight.  I’m a firm believer that the truth is more powerful than threats or fantasy.

 

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry.  This is a great story about Nazi Denmark and the heroism of the people of Denmark to spirit away the Jewish population.  Since it is told through the eyes of children, it is very easy to relate.

 

I Never Promised You a Rose Garden by Joanne Greenberg.  Another hard hitting novel.  This one is about a teenage girl’s journey through mental illness; it taught me not to take for granted my life.

 

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley.  I like this book, even though a lot of people I know didn’t, but it showed me that sometimes the hero is not a hero and that we all have to strive to be better than ourselves.

 

The Stand by Stephen King.  I would like to say this is his greatest work, but I haven’t read it all yet.  After reading this, I knew King would go down as a brilliant writer.  I thought this was a great story illustrating the goodness and evil in humankind.

 

The Five Languages of Love by Gary Chapman.  This book teaches people that we all show love in different ways and that to love someone you have to “speak” it in their language. 

 
Now I am sure there are dozens more, but those are my top ten.  My husband has his own list including Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls and The Fellowship of the Ring series by J.R.R. Tolkien.

A Mom’s plea From Cat in the Hat

I lay there with Evan

We lay there, we two.

And I said, “What do you want

To read before napping with you?”

 

“Oh Mommy, there is something

I want to read. Something that

You’ll really like, I bet.

Again I want Cat in the Hat!”

 

So that is the only book I

Read!

        Read!

                Read!

                        Read!

And I do not like it.

Not one little bit.

 

We have read this book

So many times that I can not

Count how many times.

That cat ought to be shot.

He’s smiling so nice, in fact,

That you know from the cover

He’s up to no good, bringing

More trouble on the sister and brother.

 

Oh, how I hate that ridiculous

Cat in the hat, oh I bet.

With the Thing One and Thing Two

Which are caught in the net.

And the terrible mess that they make

When their mother is away.

The ending implies it is better to lie

Than take the lecture that may

Come from the mother that day.

 

Oh what I could read!

Oh what I could read instead!

Where Wild Things Are

Or The Magic Bed

Or Finding Nemo

Or It’s a Good Day

Or It Isn’t Easy Being Big

Or Elmo’s Ducky Day

Or Kung Fu Panda or Wall-e

Or Cars, in that case,

Or The Things You Can Think

Or Arthur’s Reading Race!

 

Please, please, not again.

This really isn’t funny or fun.

Just choose another book.
Please, my sweet wonderful son.